National Allergy Strategy 250k camp for young adults in Sydney

NAS 250k camp for young adults in SydneyWe are proud to announce our upcoming camp for young adults (aged 18 to 25 years) with severe allergy who are at risk of anaphylaxis. The camp will be held from Friday 1 July to Sunday 3 July 2022 at Sydney Olympic Park, Sydney.

Over three days, participants will have the opportunity to engage in fun team activities and informative allergy discussions. National Allergy Strategy and Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia staff, alongside an allergy specialist, allergy nurse, and a dietitian with expertise in food allergy, will be attending.

Upon arrival, everyone will receive a full program outlining the weekend. We have chosen Sydney Olympic Park for its excellent facilities (accommodation will be dormitory style), the activities on offer and the accessibility by train.

There is no cost to participate as we have received government funding for the camp.

If attendees are new to the Allergy 250K project or live outside NSW, they are welcome to participate in the camp, however, we cannot fund airfares or other travel needs. Camp participants will make their way to Sydney Olympic Park on Friday afternoon and home again Sunday afternoon.  

All food allergies will be catered for and at least one allergy dietitian will be involved in meal preparation and service during the camp.

To register for this event please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. before Friday 3rd June 2022. 

We look forward to seeing everyone there! 

Read more: National Allergy Strategy 250k camp for young adults in Sydney

Statement in response to federal government funding to improve the care of Australians with allergic disease – Budget 2022

NAS AAA ASCIA CFAR MCRI Logos sq6 May 2022

NAS AAA ASCIA CFAR MCRI Logos 

pdfNAC and NACE statement 6 May 2022

On behalf of Australians living with allergic diseases, the National Allergy Strategy, a partnership between the Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA) and Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia (A&AA), and the Centre for Food & Allergy Research (CFAR), we would like to thank the Federal Government for the $26.9 million investment into allergy prevention and management announced as part of the Federal Government’s 2022 budget, that was announced on 29 March 2022. This funding is in response to the 2019 bipartisan Parliamentary Inquiry into Allergies and Anaphylaxis, and the 24 recommendations in the Walking the allergy tightrope report, which highlighted the critical need for further investment to address this continuing public health challenge.

This investment will provide support to:

  • Enable the National Allergy Strategy to transition into the National Allergy Council (NAC), to develop and implement programs to increase access to care and provide education and support for health professionals, consumers and the community.
  • Fund evidence-based education and support programs that are developed and implemented by the ASCIA and A&AA, working as a partnership in the National Allergy Council.
  • Expand the CFAR at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute into the National Allergy Centre of Excellence, to increase and coordinate research throughout Australia on food allergies, as well as drug, vaccine, insect, and pollen allergies.

Establishing a National Allergy Council is a natural progression of the highly valued and successful National Allergy Strategy.  The National Allergy Council will continue to be a partnership between the ASCIA and A&AA, the leading medical and patient support organisations for allergy in Australia.

 The CFAR will expand to become the National Allergy Centre of Excellence (NACE). NACE will generate and synthesise the evidence base that underpins the activities of the proposed National Allergy Council, to ensure that Australia remains at the forefront of evidence-based management of allergic disease.

Working together, these organisations will deliver:

  • A shared care program to significantly cut wait times to see a specialist by at least 50 per cent and improve access to quality allergy care for all Australians, especially in rural and remote areas
  • The digital infrastructure for a National Allergy Registry and Biobank to facilitate precision medicine, allowing individualised allergy healthcare for children and adults. This would include a live anaphylaxis reporting system
  • A world-first National Allergy Clinical Trials Network to provide Australians with accelerated access to safe and effective allergy treatments.
  • Continued public health guidelines and prevention programs such as the successful ‘Nip allergies in the Bub’ program, which includes practical resources for parents and educational resources to support healthcare providers.
  • New clinical and research capabilities to enable Australia to maintain its world-leading status in allergy research and to answer the most important questions in allergy that will guide the way forward.

We greatly appreciate the support that the Australian Government has given for these critical initiatives. The National Allergy Strategy, ASCIA, A&AA and CFAR would like to thank:

  • The Australian Government, and Minister Hunt in particular, for investing in the health and wellbeing of the many Australians living with allergic diseases.
  • The Hon Trent Zimmerman MP (chair) and Dr Mike Freelander MP, (deputy chair) of the bipartisan Parliamentary Inquiry into Allergies and Anaphylaxis committee.
  • Dr Katie Allen MP, member of the of the bipartisan Parliamentary Inquiry into Allergies and Anaphylaxis committee for her tireless work in advocating for those living with allergic disease

The other Parliamentary Inquiry into Allergy and Anaphylaxis committee members Mr Tony Zappia MP, Mr Milton Dick MP, Ms Angie Bell MP, Mrs Lucy Wicks MP, Dr Fiona Martin MP and Ms Bridget Archer MP.

Read more: Statement in response to federal government funding to improve the care of Australians with...

Australia leading the world: Federal funding secured for allergy prevention and management

30 March 2022

NAS AAA ASCIA CFAR Logos

Allergy experts have applauded the $26.9 million investment into allergy prevention and management announced in the Federal Government’s 2022 pre-election budget.

The funding will lead to the creation of two vital organisations, the National Allergy Council and National Allergy Centre of Excellence (NACE), that will work together to deliver world-leading initiatives and research to improve consumer safety and prevent anaphylaxis deaths.

“Australia has been termed the ‘allergy capital of the world’ with more than 5 million Australians living with allergic disease. Allergy diagnoses and hospital admissions for life-threatening allergic reactions continue to rise,” Maria Said, Co-Chair of the National Allergy Strategy and CEO of Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia said.

“This funding will revolutionise Australian allergy research, clinical care, education, and prevention, solidifying us as a world leader in this space. Ultimately, we need to reduce the alarming trend of anaphylaxis rates and tragic deaths, prevent development of allergic disease, and more effectively manage allergies that affect 20 per cent of the community.”

Allergic diseases include food, medication and insect allergies, and allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis. Eczema is also associated with allergic disease. The funding is in response to the 2019 Parliamentary Inquiry into Allergies and Anaphylaxis and the 24 recommendations in the Walking the allergy tightrope report, which highlighted the critical need for further investment to address this continuing public health challenge.

Establishing a National Allergy Council (NAC) is a natural progression of the highly valued and successful National Allergy Strategy.  The National Allergy Council will continue to be a partnership between the Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA) and Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia (A&AA), the leading medical and patient support organisations for allergy in Australia.

The Centre for Food & Allergy Research (CFAR) will expand to become the National Allergy Centre of Excellence (NACE). NACE will generate and synthesise the evidence base that underpins the activities of the proposed National Allergy Council (NAC), to ensure that Australia remains at the forefront of evidence-based management of allergic disease.

Working together, these organisations will deliver:

  • A shared care program to significantly cut wait times to see a specialist by at least 50 per cent and improve access to quality allergy care for all Australians, especially in rural and remote areas
  • The digital infrastructure for a National Allergy Registry and Biobank to facilitate precision medicine, allowing individualised allergy healthcare for children and adults. This would include a live anaphylaxis reporting system
  • A world-first National Allergy Clinical Trials Network to provide Australians with accelerated access to safe and effective allergy treatments.
  • Continued public health guidelines and prevention programs such as the successful ‘Nip allergies in the Bub’ program, which includes practical resources for parents and educational resources to support healthcare providers.
  • New clinical and research capabilities to enable Australia to maintain its world-leading status in allergy research and to answer the most important questions in allergy that will guide the way forward.

Associate Professor Kirsten Perrett, Acting Director of the Centre for Food & Allergy Research and Co-Group Leader of Population Allergy at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) said, “The establishment of the National Allergy Centre of Excellence will be a huge leap forward for our understanding of allergies, especially in an Australian context, and will provide a solid evidence-base for initiatives of the National Allergy Council. Together, we will implement the first national allergy registry alongside a live anaphylaxis reporting system, which will facilitate precision medicine and improve consumer safety and prevent anaphylaxis deaths.”

Dr Preeti Joshi, ASCIA Co-chair of the National Allergy Strategy and representative of the peak clinical body, the Australasian society of clinical immunology and allergy (ASCIA) said the funding would allow urgent projects to progress.

“Over the past seven years, the National Allergy Strategy has engaged with key stakeholders to implement urgent projects with support from the Australian Government Department of Health. However, many projects have not been progressed because of the need for significant funding support. This includes a shared care program, which is essentially a patient centred approach to care that uses the skills and knowledge of a range of health care professionals who share joint responsibility with the patient, ensuring the patient receives the right care, at the right time, from the right health professionals, in the right place. We also urgently need an anaphylaxis registry that will ultimately help us save lives. These projects have the potential to make the biggest impact on the lives of people living with allergic diseases.”

“Today, we are thankful that the Australian Government has given their support for these critical initiatives, The National Allergy Strategy, ASCIA, A&AA and the Centre for Food & Allergy Research (CFAR) would like to thank the Australian Government, and Minister Hunt in particular, for investing in the health and wellbeing of the many Australians living with allergic diseases. We would also like to acknowledge the leadership of the Hon Trent Zimmerman and the committee who led the Parliamentary Inquiry into Allergies and Anaphylaxis. We are also grateful to Dr Katie Allen, Member for Higgins, for her ongoing advocacy and support. This funding investment will ensure that there will be greater and equal access to quality care, particularly in rural, regional and remote areas,” finished Dr Joshi.

Read more: Australia leading the world: Federal funding secured for allergy prevention and management

Managing your child’s food allergy in childcare services: Wed 6 April 2022

Managing your child’s food allergy in childcare servicesDo you have a child in a children’s education and care service?

Join us to find out what Allergy Aware CEC services should be doing to manage the risk of anaphylaxis.

Allergy and Anaphylaxis Australia (A&AA) is partnering with the National Allergy Strategy to hold a webinar about how to manage food allergies and anaphylaxis in children’s education and care (CEC) services such as childcare centres, preschools, and long day care.

The webinar will include a short presentation from Dr Katie Frith, paediatric clinical immunology/allergy specialist and Ms Maria Said, CEO of Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia and Co-chair of the National Allergy Strategy. The presentations will be followed by a live question and answer session where you can have your questions answered. Dr Merryn Netting, an experienced allergy dietitian will also be available to answer questions.

Event details:

When: Wednesday 6 April 2022

Time:  7:30pm AEST | 5:30pm AWST

Where: Zoom 

Cost: Free

Register here

This webinar is one in a series of webinars being held by A&AA in partnership with the National Allergy Strategy. Visit the National Allergy Strategy’s Allergy Aware website for further information about the parent/carer webinar series.

Read more: Managing your child’s food allergy in childcare services: Wed 6 April 2022

Uploading allergy information to My Health Record from your clinical software - Webinar 31 March 2022

Webinar watchingWhen you upload information about a patient’s allergies and adverse reactions to My Health Record it becomes available to a their other treating healthcare providers. This is important for their safety. Documents uploaded to My Health Record by specialists and viewed by other healthcare providers increased by 23% in January 2022.

Find out how to upload allergy information in our upcoming 30-minute webinar suitable for specialists using a range of conformant clinical software. Dr William Smith (Clinical immunology/allergy specialist) and Dr Kathy Rainbird (Australian Digital Health Agency) will explain why this is important and how you can do this directly from your clinical software. The webinar will include a step-through demonstration using Genie software, and time for questions.

Date and time: 8pm AEDT (5pm WST) Thursday 31 March 2022

Register now: https://register.gotowebinar.com/#register/3760776590315362830

The National Allergy Strategy Australian Digital Health Agency Project has developed fact sheets to step specialists through the process of uploading allergy information via their letters and uploading an event summary. These fact sheets and others are available on the NAS Australian Digital Health Agency Project | Health Professionals page.

Read more: Uploading allergy information to My Health Record from your clinical software - Webinar 31 March...

Study shows that ASCIA guidelines for infant feeding and allergy prevention may help reduce food anaphylaxis

24 February 2022:

Baby having first solid foodA new study looking at anaphylaxis admissions reports that the rate of increase in serious allergic reactions to food among children has flattened since ASCIA (the Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy) updated their infant feeding and allergy prevention guidelines.

This study provides the first real-world evidence showing that changes to the guidelines encouraging the introduction of common allergy-causing foods by 12 months of age, were having a measurable impact on the population prevalence of food anaphylaxis presentations to hospital.

Dr Ray Mullins, a clinical immunology/allergy specialist who led the study stated, “A slowing in the rates of increase in food anaphylaxis admissions also occurred in those aged 5-14 years, born after the 2008 changes. These changes were not seen in older teens aged 15 and over who were born before 2008, who could not have benefited from the changing guidelines.”

This is encouraging as the National Allergy Strategy, Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia and ASCIA continue to promote the Nip allergies in the Bub website and create new resources to help parents introduce the common allergy causing foods.

Click here to go to the published study.

Click here to visit the Nip allergies in the Bub website.

Read more: Study shows that ASCIA guidelines for infant feeding and allergy prevention may help reduce food...

NEW Nip allergies in the Bub infant feeding video series

15 February 2022:

We are excited to announce a new series of short videos to help parents feed their babies the common allergy causing foods.

We have created four videos - one for each stage of feeding development. The videos demonstrate how to prepare some of the recipes from the Nip allergies in the Bub recipe booklet.

Textures of first foods  Textures of mashed foodsTextures of soft chopped foods  Textures of toddler foods

Click here to view the videos.

The Nip allergies in the Bub recipe booklet has also been updated. We have also updated to include photos of the recipes that are featured in the videos.

Nip allergies in the Bub recipe booklet Nip allergies in the Bub recipe booklet recipe 8 Nip allergies in the Bub recipe booklet

Click here to view the recipe booklet. 

The Nip allergies in the Bub website provides practical advice about how to introduce the common allergy causing foods to babies and how to optimise eczema management, to help prevent food allergy.

The Nip allergies in the Bub website has undergone a major review to make sure the content is consistent with the latest food allergy prevention evidence-base and best-practice.

ReadSpeaker has also been added to the website to allow for content to be read aloud and/or translated into more than 20 languages.

Read more: NEW Nip allergies in the Bub infant feeding video series

All about Allergens course gets an update and a new single course for cooks and chefs now available

19 October 2021: 

New Courses for All about Allergens

The National Allergy Strategy’s All about Allergens online training courses provide staff working in the food service sector with free and accessible education about food allergy. All about Allergens courses are available for staff working in general food service, hospitals, schools, children’s education and care, and camps. Visit https://foodallergytraining.org.au to access the courses.

NEW! All about Allergens 2021 

We are excited to offer a new and refreshed 2021 version of All about Allergens.

The original All about Allergens course was developed for workers in any food business to provide essential information about managing customers with food allergy including communication tools, reading labels, and avoiding cross contamination of food allergens when preparing and serving food. It is our most popular course, with over 1000 enrolments per month.

To ensure that the course stays relevant and appealing to the sector, it has undergone a major review. The new version:

  • Is shorter - takes around 45 minutes to complete
  • Is more applicable to food services where staff work both front of house and back of house (kitchen) roles, particularly in café and restaurant chains
  • Is interactive and engaging with information conveyed through videos, images and click through slides
  • Is up to date with the latest evidence-based best-practice and legislation changes such as those recently made to Australian labelling laws
  • Has a simplified final assessment that tests knowledge using straight forward questions.
New AAA 2021

On successful completion, a certificate can be downloaded to forward or print for employers. Certificates of completion from earlier versions of the All about Allergens course are still valid if completed within the last 2 years.

NEW! All about Allergens for Cooks and Chefs

We have listened to the food service sector, and now cooks and chefs only need to complete one course – All about Allergens for Cooks and Chefs. Previously cooks and chefs needed to complete All about Allergens and The next step for cooks and chefs: general food service. Now cooks and chefs can access everything they need to know from one combined course which takes around 1 hour to complete.

New AAA cc

On successful completion, a certificate can be downloaded to forward or print for employers. Certificates of completion from The next step for cooks and chefs course are still valid if completed within the last 2 years.

Read more: All about Allergens course gets an update and a new single course for cooks and chefs now available

New best practice guidelines to protect children from severe allergic reactions in schools and childcare

7 October 2021

Best Practice Guidelines Schools and CEC Launch with Dr Katie Allen MP

Today Professor Katie Allen MP, launched the National Allergy Strategy released Best practice guidelines for anaphylaxis prevention and management in schools and children’s education and care (CEC) services (Guidelines) on behalf of the Hon Greg Hunt, Minister for Health. See the NAS Best Practice Guidelines Zoom Launch here

The Guidelines have been developed through extensive consultation with key stakeholder organisations, staff working in schools and CEC services, and parents/guardians of children attending schools and CEC services. They have been developed to provide consistent, evidence-based, best practice guidance for staff in school and CEC services, and parents. The Guidelines and associated supporting resources will reduce the risk of anaphylaxis in schools and CEC services while supporting children to participate in the full range of activities.


NAS Best Practice Guidelines Zoom Launch 7 October 2021


Guidelines supporting resources

To help schools and CEC services to meet the recommendations of the Guidelines, several supporting resources have been created. The supporting resources are designed to help schools and CEC services consider site specific issues relating to anaphylaxis prevention and management and put into place appropriate strategies to allow children at risk of anaphylaxis to safely participate fully in school and CEC service activities.

Read more: New best practice guidelines to protect children from severe allergic reactions in schools and...

National Allergy Strategy Rationale

Allergic diseases have become an increasingly important chronic disease and public health issue in Australia and other developed countries over the last two decades, contributing to increased demand for medical services, significant economic cost of care and reduced quality of life of people with allergic diseases and their carers.

Information Partner

healthdirect: 
trusted health information
Funded by the governments of Australia

Lead organisations

ascia logo 2018s
Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA) is the leading medical organisation for allergy in Australia. 

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Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia (A&AA) is the leading patient support organisation for allergy in Australia. 

The National Allergy Strategy has received funding from the Australian Government Department of Health for the following projects:
Food allergy prevention | 250K Youth Project | Food service | Drug allergy | Shared Care Model

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